This is an in-depth study on Leviticus, which was written in order to reveal how a sinful Israel could have and maintain a relationship with the holy Yahweh who dwelt among them and could express that relationship through worship. This study is 12 hours long (recorded in 2017). This is worth 1 Bible CEUs.

 

Leviticus Notes (946.22 KB)

play-film-icon Leviticus Overview Video Part 1

play-film-icon Leviticus Overview Video Part 2

 

November 13

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Leviticus Introduction 01
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32:59 min
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Leviticus Introduction 02
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39:49 min

November 20

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Leviticus 1:1-2
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31:20 min
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Leviticus 1:3-17
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29:43 min
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Leviticus 2:1-3:17
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36:08 min
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Leviticus 4:1-7:38
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28:39 min

November 27

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Leviticus 8:1-9:24
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27:08 min
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Leviticus 10:1-20
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36:57 min
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Leviticus 11:1-47
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30:49 min
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Leviticus 12:1-8
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15:04 min

December 04

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Leviticus 13:1-14:57
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37:21 min
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Leviticus 15:1-33
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25:35 min
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Leviticus 16:1-34
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25:19 min
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Leviticus 17:1-16
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19:13 min

 

Leviticus reveals how a sinful Israel could have and maintain a relationship with the holy Yahweh who dwelt among them and could express that relationship through worship. How Israel was to worship Yahweh is the sole focus of the book. Worship is not just in music and praise but in how one presents him or herself in obedience and righteousness before Yahweh (1 Sam. 15:2-23) and in service to Him in creation in order to expand His kingdom.

In Gen. 2:15, the Hebrew word for “to serve, till” is used of cultivating the soil (Gen. 2:5; 3:23; 4:2, 12, etc.). The word is commonly used in the religious sense of serving God (Deut. 4:19) and of the priests serving in the tabernacle (Num. 3:7-8; 4:23-24, 26, etc.). To “guard, keep” can mean guard (Gen. 4:9; 30:31) but is used more commonly of religious commands and duties (Gen. 17:9; Lev. 18:5) and the guarding of the tabernacle (Num. 1:53; 3:7-8). These are the root words for worship used throughout Scripture. Never does Scripture use the word worship for singing songs. This is called praise. Worship, as portrayed in the Bible, is dedicating one’s life to working in the garden/creation/kingdom of Yahweh in order to do His will (Rom. 12:1). Praise is what you do when you have already worshiped Yahweh throughout the week and have seen Him at work in your life.

Genesis 1-2 clearly established that the focus is on the fact that Yahweh had created a temple on earth so that He could dwell with humanity. Genesis 1 made the point that humanity was to rule over the garden and creation, maintaining its order and goodness. Genesis 2 made the point that humanity was to be priests serving in the garden/temple of Yahweh. The purpose of a priest is to mediate between Yahweh and creation. This means the priest links Yahweh and creation together in a covenantal relationship.

The tabernacle became a microcosm of the garden that humanity had lost. Through sacrifice, which Scriptures define as means of worship (Jn. 15:10; Rom. 12:1; Heb. 13:15; 1 Pet. 4:17; 1 Jn. 3:24; 5:3), Israel cleansed themselves and made themselves holy so that they could reenter the presence of Yahweh (“the garden”). Likewise, it was through Israel’s obedience to Yahweh’s Law, as revealed in the Torah, that one was able to live a holy life in the world and reflect the character and image of Yahweh to those around them. Through their sacrifice and obedience, Israel worshiped Yahweh with their lives.

Rom. 12:1 clearly states that presenting our bodies and our lives in obedience to Yahweh is our greatest act of worship. If Yahweh is righteous and holy and we are commanded to reflect Him in this, then the greatest way to glorify and worship Him is through our obedience and righteous acts. Leviticus details how one is to live an obedient life and thus enter the presence of Yahweh in order to worship Him. Though we are not under the Law, we are still commanded by Law to know His Law and meditate on it. As one looks at the laws in the Torah, the historical context of the laws should be considered. They are not timeless, universal precepts; rather, they were revealed to the covenant nation of Israel at a particular time in their history. They were designed to mold Israel into a holy people in a particular historical time period. Though Yahweh’s holiness is unchanging, its expression may vary from age to age. Thus, we can find what the underlying principle in the Law is and then, through the Holy Spirit, who is the living Law of Yahweh written on our hearts, implement those principles in our own lives as we seek to obey Yahweh.