This study in Joshua takes a look at the history and culture of the nation of Israel as they enter and take control of the Promised Land that Yahweh has given them. This study is ? hours long (recorded in 2018). This is worth 1 Bible CEU.

 

Joshua Notes (1.26 MB)

play-film-icon Joshua Overview Video

pdf icon The Extermination of the Canaanites Article

 

Sept. 10, 2018

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Joshua Setting and Structure
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14:27 min
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Joshua Purpose and Themes
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23:35 min
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Joshua 1:1-11
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13:31 min
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Joshua 1:12-18
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11:11 min
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Joshua 2:1-7
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20:30 min
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Joshua 2:8-16
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15:54 min
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Joshua 2:17-24
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21:37 min

Sept. 17, 2018

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Joshua Geography
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8:55 min
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Joshua 3:1-17
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17:34 min
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Joshua 4:1-5:1
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14:45 min
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Joshua 5:2-15
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15:41 min
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Joshua 6:1-19
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13:46 min
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Joshua 6:20-27
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7:21 min
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Extermination of the Canaanites 01
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24:41 min
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Extermination of the Canaanites 02
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22:07 min

 

The title of this book in Hebrew, Greek, and English comes from the main character in the story, Joshua, who may or may not have been the writer of the book. The title is appropriate because “Joshua” means “Yahweh saves.” Joshua is the Hebrew name that translates into Aramaic as Jesus. Where Exodus told the story of what Yahweh was saving Israel from, Joshua tells the story of what Yahweh is saving Israel too. This book is a record of Yahweh’s deliverance of the Israelites into the land of blessing that He had promised them.

The books of Exodus, Leviticus, and Numbers begin with the conjunction and, meaning they were meant to be read as the sequel to Genesis—and sequentially from there. Conversely, the book of Deuteronomy does not begin with the conjunction and, while the books of Joshua through Kings do begin with the conjunction and. Thus, Genesis through Numbers are linked together and tell of Israel outside of the Promised Land. Deuteronomy is the bridge between Israel not being in the land and Israel being in the land. In the same way, Joshua through Chronicles are linked together and tell about Israel in the Promised Land. Deuteronomy is the beginning of what scholars call the Deuteronomic History, which includes the books of Deuteronomy through Kings.

The authorship of the book of Joshua is anonymous even though undoubtedly Joshua did write some parts of the book (Josh. 24:26). Samuel or a contemporary of Samuel is most likely the compiler and editor of the book. This is seen in the repetition of the phrase “to this day” (Josh. 4:9; 5:9; 7:26; etc.). This points to a date no later than the 1000s BC because of the mention of the Jebusites occupying Jerusalem (Josh. 16:63; 16:10), whom David removed from Jerusalem in 1003 BC (2 Sam 5:6-10). The reference in Josh. 6:25 to Rahab still being alive suggests an even earlier date than the 1000s BC.

The first purpose of the book of Joshua is to demonstrate Yahweh’s faithfulness to Israel to fulfill His promises to give them the land of Canaan. Over and over again, the narrator makes the point that Israel conquered the land of Canaan and received the tribal allotments that He had promised them. Joshua is the first book to refer to the land of Israel. This serves as an apology for Yahweh, that all of Israel’s previous defeats in the wilderness were not due to His lack of power or faithfulness.

The second purpose of the book is to call Israel to remain faithful to Yahweh so that they may receive His blessings. Their faithfulness is why they have had success in the land when their parents did not in the wilderness. If Israel wants to continue to experience the presence and blessings of Yahweh, they must hold to His Law in obedience.