This is an in-depth study on the books of Kings, which develops the story of Israel from the reign of Solomon and the kingdom split to the exile of the Israel under the Assyrians in 722 BC and Judah under the Babylonians in 586 BC. This study is ? hours long (recorded in 2019). This is worth 3 Bible CEUs.

Go to the 1 & 2 Kings class registration page for more information.

 

1 & 2 Kings Notes (883.3 KB)

 

September 09, 2019

1 & 2 Kings Setting and Purpose
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17:17 min
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1 & 2 Kings Themes and Structure
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31:27 min
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1 Kings 1:1-10
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19:04 min
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1 Kings 1:1-53
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25:22 min
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1 Kings 2:1-11
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16:59 min
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September 16, 2019

1 Kings 2:13-46
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29:05 min
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1 Kings 3:1-15
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23:11 min
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1 Kings 3:16-4:6
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17:02 min
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1 Kings 4:7-34
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21:00 min
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1 Kings 5:1-18
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16:28 min
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September 23, 2019

1 Kings The Unwanted Temple
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33:01 min
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1 Kings 6:1-7:51
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19:04 min
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1 Kings 8:1-66
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28:08 min
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1 Kings 9:1-28
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19:17 min
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September 30, 2019

1 Kings 10:1-29
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19:56 min
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1 Kings 11:1-25
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23:15 min
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1 Kings 11:26-43
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22:58 min
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1 Kings 12:1-24
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24:44 min
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October 7, 2019

1 Kings 12:25-33
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15:13 min
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1 Kings 13:1-34
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31:07 min
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1 Kings 14:1-31
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25:02 min
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1 Kings 15:1-16:7
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23:40 min
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October 14, 2019

1 Kings 16:8-28
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16:58 min
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1 Kings 16:29-34
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15:43 min
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1 Kings 17:1-6
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19:24 min
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1 Kings 17:7-24
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27:25 min
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1 Kings 18:1-29
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25:03 min
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1 Kings 18:30-46
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13:56 min
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Originally in the Hebrew Bible the books of 1 and 2 Samuel and 1 and 2 Kings were two books called Samuel and Kings. The Septuagint (Greek translation of the Hebrew Bible) was the first to divide the books into four books. The Septuagint translators titled these books 1-4 Kingdoms. That division has persisted ever since. The titles 1-2 Samuel were given to 1-2 Kingdoms, while the titles 1-2 Kings were given to 3-4 Kingdoms by Jerome in his Latin translation, the Vulgate (late 400s AD). This shows that the original authors, editors, and translators did not see these books as four separate books but rather a closely linked, multi-volume book.

1 Kings begins with the conjunction and, meaning it was meant to be read as the sequel to Deuteronomy, Joshua, Judges, Ruth, and the book of Samuel. Deuteronomy is the beginning of what scholars call the Deuteronomic History, which includes the books of Deuteronomy through Kings. Judges continues the history of Israel that began in Deuteronomy, of a unified people under the headship of Yahweh who brought them into the Promised Land and delivered the Canaanites into their hands. While the Torah (Genesis–Deuteronomy) tells the story of Israel being promised the land of Canaan and brought to its border, the Deuteronomic History tells the story of Israel living in the land before its exile in 722 and 586 BC.

Who authored the book of Kings and when are not known. Authorship is traditionally credited to an individual in the exilic period who recorded the history of the monarchies in in his own time. Different parts of the book of Kings were gathered from different sources into a final narrative story. The account of King Jehoiachin’s (last king) release from Babylonian captivity (2 Kgs. 25:27-30) points to a date of final composition sometime after that event. The final editing was probably made no later than the 539 BC, which is when the people of Israel returned to the Promised Land.

The purpose of the book of Kings is to explain how the chosen people of Yahweh ended up in exile. It is clear from the prophetic books that many Israelites never thought that Yahweh would ever bring judgment on them since He had promised to give them the Promised Land and dwell with them. Now in exile, many of them were asking the questions, “How this could happen to us?” and “How could Yahweh violate His promises?” The answer that the author gives in the book of Kings is that the people of Yahweh forfeited the promises of Yahweh because they refused to submit to the will of Yahweh as spoken through the prophets of Yahweh.

To make this point the author tells the story of the failure of the kings of Israel (northern kingdom) and Judah (southern kingdom) to obey Yahweh, abstain from idol worship, and rule justly over their kingdoms. Deuteronomy 27-28 made it clear that even though Yahweh had promised His people the land of Canaan and fertility in the land, this was dependent upon their obedience to His Laws. Their failure to do so would bring famine, plagues, invasions of other nations, and eventually exile from the land. However, Yahweh’s faithfulness to His people shows that though the people deserved to be in exile, Yahweh would honor His promises to never abandon them and bring them back to the Promised Land one day.

The author’s evaluation of the prophets, kings, and Israel is not kind. He highlights their faith and obedience but does not shy away from their failures and disobedience. No one escapes his harsh critique for it is their sin that lead to the exile. But one has to have a knowledge of the Deuteronomic Law, for his critique is subtle using allusions to Deuteronomy rather than directly stating their sins.